How to go green with Lighting

By Ombajo V Gedion

Going green is so common a phrase as it possibly can be. It’s mostly a phrase many people like to identify with but don’t exactly know how to go about. For major corporates, it is a phrase that if well packaged and mentioned around, it can enhance a brand. It can even secure funding. But when is someone or something said to have gone green? Does it have any benefits? And why is it the most recognizable buzzword of the 21st century? …If you have ever heard about saving the earth from depletion and environmental sustainability, that is the point.

Greenness can be achieved in many aspects. Lighting for instance is an area in which everyone can act. These acts are very simple almost costs nothing and can be done by anyone irrespective of their technical background. After all, we all need light, efficient lighting for that matter, and going green is an act away. Lighting offers the best opportunity for us to be green.

So how do we then go green in our lighting systems?

  1. Rush for the LED’s Retrofit and Relamp

You see there are these lighting technologies we are so used to, the yellow incandescent bulbs that get so hot. Or the white spiral bulbs that look like ice cream (CFL’s) or even the long delicate fluorescent tubes that take ages to come on and flicker thereafter to your annoyance. These are old class and a

LED Tubelight

LED Tube light

sorry abuse to modern technology. LED’s are your ticket to being green. You will use less energy, pay less on bills and if you love aesthetics, walk with me, LED’s are going to be your wonderful companion. Say goodbye to flickers and heating and constant replacement because LED’s can stay for as long as five to ten years.

  1. Cultivate Green Habits

To be green, you have to think green meaning you must behave green. And it’s the easiest thing to do, way easier than switching your TV on. As efficient as your lighting systems might be, it makes no sense to have lights on when no one’s around. Turn out lights in rooms or parts of the house where no one is. Teach your family and friends about it too and it will become second nature after breathing. If possible, practice switching off your lights whenever you don’t need them.

  1. Just get Green Energy

Install solar power systems to supply your lighting energy. You will basically be extending the sun’s light into the night. It’s like extending sunrise hours. And it is not just possible, it is very easy to do. Purpose to include clean energy into your power mix. You will save so much on electricity bills to a point of shock.

  1. Make use of Daylight

There is no need to have lights on during the day, for what exactly? The sun supplies enough light to use. Unless you are in a basement or a dark room,

Skylights

Skylights

let in daylight and let go of electrical lighting. By far, the best source of light is the sun, which gives off free, full-spectrum light all day. Make the most of daylight by keeping your blinds/curtains open.  Put in some skylights and you will even get better results.

  1. Use Dimmers and Presence Detectors
    Presence detectors can be a good way to keep lights turned off when they’re not needed. Especially if you can’t remember to switch lights off by yourself. Then these are your sure saviors. Dimmers, just as their name, they dim the light. They can give you just the right amount of light and timers can be set to turn things on and off when needed.

 

  1. Use disposable lighting products

Most lighting bulbs and tubes get old shortly and fail to work and so need to be disposed. Fluorescents and CFL’s have mercury and so you cannot just dispose them in the trash as you wish. By the way, mercury is a sworn enemy of the brain and kidneys, it’s that hazardous. LED’s on the other hand contain no mercury making their disposal way easier.

If you want to go green in your lighting, and you were still clueless, explore any of the six tips or better still, put all of them into practice. Friends, let’s meet in the future that we are busy sustaining.

The Writer is an Energy Engineer at Eenovators Ltd.

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